KNOW YOUR BUTTER CHICKEN BETTER

Posted on Posted in FOOD, NEWS

Yes! Well! No surprises, we the foodies, do not eat to survive. But, solely survive to EAT! Yes, our entire existence revolves around food and we have no qualms coming to terms with that. I’m a Punjabi and I swear by Great Holy plate of butter chicken. And let’s not kid ourselves; my ever increasing giant waistline is proof enough.
The Great Indian Butter Chicken Curry. The mother of all Mughlai and North-Indian food. Before everyone starts drooling, let’s delve into business.

Yes! Well! No surprises, we the foodies, do not eat to survive. But, solely survive to EAT! Yes, our entire existence revolves around food and we have no qualms coming to terms with that. I’m a Punjabi and I swear by Great Holy plate of butter chicken. And let’s not kid ourselves; my ever increasing giant waistline is proof enough.
The Great Indian Butter Chicken Curry. The mother of all Mughlai and North-Indian food. Before everyone starts drooling, let’s delve into business.
It’s speculated by heaps about the exact origins of this rich, buttery and creamy gravy with succulently juicy tandoori chicken curry. The most-widely accepted version is the one where it is invented by Kundan Lal Gujral in his restaurant Moti Mahal at Daryaganj, Old Delhi in 1950. Hence, the invention of the great soul comforting curry is credited to Moti Mahal, by far; that has now emerged as a chain of restaurants globally. Moti Mahal, too, considers serving the exact same recipe since 70-odd years, as a tutelage.
Much acclaimed food critic, Vir Sanghvi in one of his articles, Rude Food in the Hindustan Times’ Brunch magazine has quoted his rendezvous with Kundan Lal Gujral’s grandson Monish Gujral who now runs the Moti Mahal chain. According to him, The idea of butter chicken rose out of a necessity. His cooked chickens would dry out in no time and worrying about this, he came up with a sauce to keep them moist and juicy. And voila! The butter sauce or gravy was created. This too, was an experiment. Gujral used the leftover chicken juices from marinade trays and lengthened those using tomatoes and butter. Butter and more notoriously crazy amounts of butter!
And soon, tandoori or roasted chicken was tossed in this gravy and served to Delhi-ites that garnered rave reviews to the restaurant. If this butter wasn’t enough for us, they even started serving butter chicken with nan-bread laden with butter-the butter nan.
Of course, almost every food joint emerging then started to serve this raging curry, with its own reconstructed recipe. But only Moti Mahal whipped up the original flavour appealing to ++the palates of the masses. The butter chicken curry voyaged and reached almost every country known to man.
It is speculated too, that butter chicken is a very near dear cousin the Chicken Tikka Masala which was invented in The Great Britain much before the invention of Butter Chicken. However, the same is not true. There are vast differences between the two dishes. Differences which can be reserved for a round of debate sometime later.
On personal recommendations, visit Pandara Road and dine in any of the restaurants you see. They’re all pretty good. HaveMore and Gulati serve some of the best butter chicken curries.
What’s left to do now is to go home, order a dish of butter chicken and hot butter nan’s and indulge your tired self into the pleasure of it, making both your tummy and soul joyous and satisfied. Then, you can go sleep it off with an untroubled smile on your face and it will feel like there’s nothing wrong with the world. The world is a beautiful place with butter chicken in it.

in his restaurant Moti Mahal at Daryaganj, Old Delhi in 1950. Hence, the invention of the great soul comforting curry is credited to Moti Mahal, by far; that has now emerged as a chain of restaurants globally. Moti Mahal, too, considers serving the exact same recipe since 70-odd years, as a tutelage.
Much acclaimed food critic, Vir Sanghvi in one of his articles, Rude Food in the Hindustan Times’ Brunch magazine has quoted his rendezvous with Kundan Lal Gujral’s grandson Monish Gujral who now runs the Moti Mahal chain. According to him, The idea of butter chicken rose out of a necessity. His cooked chickens would dry out in no time and worrying about this, he came up with a sauce to keep them moist and juicy. And voila! The butter sauce or gravy was created. This too, was an experiment. Gujral used the leftover chicken juices from marinade trays and lengthened those using tomatoes and butter. Butter and more notoriously crazy amounts of butter!
And soon, tandoori or roasted chicken was tossed in this gravy and served to Delhi-ites that garnered rave reviews to the restaurant. If this butter wasn’t enough for us, they even started serving butter chicken with nan-bread laden with butter-the butter nan.
Of course, almost every food joint emerging then started to serve this raging curry, with its own reconstructed recipe. But only Moti Mahal whipped up the original flavour appealing to ++the palates of the masses. The butter chicken curry voyaged and reached almost every country known to man.
It is speculated too, that butter chicken is a very near dear cousin the Chicken Tikka Masala which was invented in The Great Britain much before the invention of Butter Chicken. However, the same is not true. There are vast differences between the two dishes. Differences which can be reserved for a round of debate sometime later.
On personal recommendations, visit Pandara Road and dine in any of the restaurants you see. They’re all pretty good. HaveMore and Gulati serve some of the best butter chicken curries.
What’s left to do now is to go home, order a dish of butter chicken and hot butter nan’s and indulge your tired self into the pleasure of it, making both your tummy and soul joyous and satisfied. Then, you can go sleep it off with an untroubled smile on your face and it will feel like there’s nothing wrong with the world. The world is a beautiful place with butter chicken in it.

NUTRITION CHART butter-chicken

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